Immigration to Germany

Germany officially the Federal Republic of Germany, includes 16 constituent states and covers an area of 357,021 square kilometers (137,847 sq mi) with a largely temperate seasonal climate. Its capital and largest city is Berlin. With about 81.5 million inhabitants, Germany is the most populous member state in the European Union.

In the 21st century, Germany is a great power and has the world's fourth-largest economy by nominal GDP, as well as the fifth-largest by PPP. As a global leader in several industrial and technological sectors, it is both the world's third-largest exporter and importer of goods. Germany is a developed country with a very high standard of living sustained by a skilled and productive society. It upholds a social security and universal health care system, environmental protection and a tuition-free university education.

Germany was a founding member of the European Union in 1993. It is part of the Schengen Area, and became a co-founder of the Eurozone in 1999. Germany is a member of the United Nations, NATO, the G8, the G20, and the OECD. The national military expenditure is the 9th highest in the world. Known for its rich cultural history, Germany has been continuously the home of influential artists, philosophers, musicians, sportsmen, entrepreneurs, Scientists and inventors.

Germany was a founding member of the European Union in 1993. It is part of the Schengen Area, and became a co-founder of the Eurozone in 1999. Germany is a member of the United Nations, NATO, the G8, the G20, and the OECD. The national military expenditure is the 9th highest in the world. Known for its rich cultural history, Germany has been continuously the home of influential artists, philosophers, musicians, sportsmen, entrepreneurs, Scientists and inventors.

SOME FACTS ABOUT ITS INDUSTRY

Germany has often been called a nation of poets and philosophers. Yet it is also a land of invention and innovation. Many essential products of the modern world are based on German discoveries. This story of technological ingenuity stretches from the automobile and the X-ray machine to headache tablets and rotor blades for wind turbines. Today, the country remains a centre of innovation, with a host of German companies from diverse sectors operating at the very cutting edge of technology.

World's 50 largest companies, nine are German: BASF, BMW, Daimler, Deutsche Post, Deutsche Telekom, E.ON, Metro, Siemens, and Volkswagen.

HochTief is the world's leading international construction firm, and the Deutsche Bank one of its biggest financial institutions.

In terms of money spent on research and development, Daimler and Siemens rank third and fourth in the world, while Volkswagen, Bayer, Hoechst, Bosch, BASF, Boehringer/Ingelheim, Deutsche Telekom, and Mannesman also occupy places among the first 90 (International Herald-Tribune, 26 Feb. 2000).

Germany's automobile, engineering, chemical, pharmaceutical, and high-end appliance firms are well known, as is its leadership in design, but the country's information enterprises are also significant.

Bertelsmann is the world's largest publisher, and the German book-publishing industry as a whole ranks third in the world (behind England and China), traditionally producing over a third more new titles each year than does the United States (see The Bowker Annual). In fact, 10% of all the world's books are printed in German. Germany is also among the leaders in computing

SAP is the world's largest business software company and the world's third-largest independent software provider.

A 1999 study by McKinsey found that the Munich area's 1,800 computer firms, with over 100,000 employees, formed the world's fourth largest concentration of hardware and software producers (after Silicon Valley, Boston, and London). Munich is also home to 115 biotech companies, while Dresden hosts 765 semiconductor firms. On the internet, German is one of the most-frequently used languages, and '.de' is the world's most widely-used country-specific domain.

According to Guardian, wall street Journal, Bloomberg Business, Euraactiv.com and many other reliable sources, After the United States, Germany ranks as second most popular immigration destination.

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR GERMANY ( BACHELOR, MASTER, PHD.)

BACHELOR PROGRAMME:

General application requirements

Admission to most study programmes in Germany requires you to take all or part of the following steps:

  • Provide a high-school graduate certificate, called Abitur in Germany.
  • Find out if your certificate is recognized by the German university.
  • You might have to take a written examination.
  • Confirming your German language proficiency, or English proficiency if choosing an English-taught programme.
  • Prove that you can pay for your stay in Germany.
  • Present proof of scholarship, if applicable.
  • Get health insurance – usually about 80 EUR per month. Some universities may offer service packages including accommodation, meal vouchers and a health insurance policy.
MASTER PROGRAMME:

Required documents:

The following documents must be submitted along with the application form:

  • school leaving certificate in the original language, and a certified translation
  • list of grades and subjects in the original language, and a certified translation
  • university entrance examination/certificate (if required in your country) in the original language, and a certified copy

And, if you have attended university:

  • academic degree in the original language, and a certified translation
  • transcript of records for each semester in the original language, and a certified translation
  • language certificate

All documents can be submitted in German, English or French.

Documents in any other language must be translated. Translations must be certified by the German embassy or consulate or the documents must be translated by a sworn translator in Germany.

Please submit legally-certified copies of all documents only (no originals).

Certifications will only be accepted if they were made by:

  • the institution (school or university) which issued the original
  • the office of the mayor or city council (Ortsgericht) of a German town
  • a notary public
  • a German embassy or a German consulate
  • the foreign embassy or consulate in Germany

The certification must include:

  • authentication that the copy corresponds with the original
  • signature of the certifying person
  • official seal

Certifications are not accepted if issued by the following institutions: charitable institutions, parish offices, translators, health insurers, banks, building societies, student unions etc.

Courses held in German

The International Office decides on whether the submitted certificates can be recognised as a qualification for direct admission to university. Applicants with certificates qualifying for direct admission can be given conditional admission to a degree course if they submit a German language certificate for courses instructed in German or an English language certificate for courses instructed in English. After passing the DSH (Level DSH-2 required) examination, a German language proficiency test known in full as "Deutsche Sprachprüfung für den Hochschulzugang", students can begin with their chosen course.

Applicants are exempt from the DSH-2 examination if they hold one of the following certificates:

  • Zentrale Oberstufenprüfung (ZOP) of the Goethe Institut
  • Kleines Deutsches Sprachdiplom of the Goethe Institut
  • Deutsches Sprachdiplom (Level 2) of the Kultusministerkonferenz
  • TestDaF level 4 in all test sections

Bilingual courses: Additionally, a TOEFL Test ist required for the bilingual courses

Courses held in English (language of instruction)

English language certificates are required for the Master's courses Electrical Power Engineering (EPE), Information and Communication Engineering (ICE), TropHEE, International Cooperation and Urban Development, Materials Science and Distributed Software Systems.

  • TOEFL test (paper 570, cb230, iBT 88)
  • IELTS 6.5
  • UNIcert III
  • CAE (Grade C1)

Additionally, a proof of German language is obtained for the bilingual courses.

How and when can I apply?

The universities accepts applications for the winter semester from May to July 15 (extended to the start of the classes for some departments/degrees) and for the summer semester from December to January 15.
The type of qualification (such as the German Abitur, or a foreign qualification) is the deciding factor. Nationality plays no role.

DSH Preparation courses:

Admission requirements for the DSH intensive course are:

1. a direct university entrance qualification, i.e. a school-leaving certificate allowing you to study at a German university

2. German skills at level B2. For example:

  • Goethe-Zertifikat B2 or
  • Zertifikat Deutsch B2, TELC or
  • TestDaF with TDN 3 in all categories or
  • B2 certificate issued by a German university or an

Other certificates issued by other institutions might be accepted in individual cases. Mere attendance certificates without a test result will not be accepted.

For your application you need:
  • The application form.
  • school-leaving certificate and/or university certificates (certified copy) as university entrance qualification
  • Atleast proof of B2-German skills (certified copy)
PHD PROGRAMMES:

Application procedure:

If you are interested in phd, then following procedure has to be followed:

  • Explain your project in detail or a Research Proposal.
  • Indicate the necessary language requirements (will you write your thesis in German or English).
  • Once you have found a supervisor (hold a letter of endorsement of a professor), you will have to apply as a doctoral student to the respective doctoral examination committee. You should apply with the help of your future supervisor.
  • If you decide to matriculate, you will need officially translated and officially authenticated school leaving certificates and university degrees. You will then be able to apply for matriculation. Becoming a student has its advantages: you will get the semester ticket which enables you to use local public transport for free, you will get meals at a reduced price at student restaurants, you will be able to apply for a place in a student hall of residence, you will pay reduced entrance fees for selected museums, etc. Matriculation and re-matriculation for the next semester come with a semester fee, however (around € 260 - 400 per semester).
  • You will need a valid visa for entry to the Federal Republic of Germany. You will have to prove sufficient financial resources for the entire period of your stay (finance plan) and you will have to settle all matters pertaining to your family. Please enquire whether you can enter Germany with a student visa or a visa for scientists. You can apply for both at the German Embassy of your home country. You will need the letter of application from university as well as the finance plan showing that you have enough financial resources for the entire period of your stay for a student visa.
  • The visa for scientists requires a letter of a professor stating that you will get a post at University or a grant plus the finance plan.
Ranking of German universities

Germany, Switzerland, and Austria are all famous for the quality of their universities, and Germany enrolls the third-highest number of international students in the world - it is also 1st in the amount of financial support it offers them. In the 2012 QS Ranking of "The Best Student Cities in the World," German-speaking cities dominate the category of "Quality of Living" for students, with the first five places going to Vienna, Zurich, Munich, Sidney, and Berlin.

Universities in Germany offer plenty of choice, including some of the most prestigious institutions in Western Europe. Germany's highest ranked university in the QS World University Rankings® 2014/15 is Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg (ranked 49th in the world), followed by Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München (52=) and Technische Universität München (54th).

Beyond that, every major German city you can think of has at least one university ranked among the world's best. A total of 17 German universities make the world's top 250, and more than 40 are included within the world's top 650. This establishes Germany well within the world's higher education elite.

Excellent higher education staff members and infrastructure

Higher education in Germany consists of three different types of institutions:

  • Universities
  • Universities of Applied Sciences
  • Technical, Art, Film and Music Colleges

Most public universities in Germany date from the middle Ages, barring a significant tradition of qualitative education and prominent names in various academic disciplines. Other institutions were either founded after the Second World War or fairly recently, including most of the private universities in Germany.

Universities in Germany are known to excel in both infrastructure and curricula. Optimal facilities providing contemporary technology, and a diversified professional staff that contributes to compounding an enlightening curricula, ensure promising future generations of experts regardless of the discipline. Innovation, international cooperation and practice-oriented studies are considered to be the revolutionary roads to a world-class education.

Internationally recognized degrees

Universities in Germany now all operate under the Bologna reform, which ensures all students get a unified and internationally recognized degree such as Bachelor's, Masters or PhD.

  • BA/BSc equals 6 semesters of study
  • MA/MSc equals to 2-4 semesters, depending on the program
  • PhD equals 4-6 semesters, depending on the program

This applies to most academic disciplines, except for medicine, law and pharmacy. In these subjects students are still educated in the traditional way; a state exam is conducted at the end of studies, and the course lasts a few more semesters than an ordinary bachelor's degree.

Some Study programs taught in English

Studying in Germany not only comes for free, but you can also do it in English if your German language skills are not so good. English is an international and widely spoken language, taught as a second language in the majority of schools around the world. A fresh start in a new country, a new university AND a new language can be tougher than you think; therefore you might want to go easy on yourself and take up an international program taught in English while your German language skills advance, and then perhaps switch to studying in Germany.

However, earning some German language skills always makes life easier on and off campus. Taking basic German language courses will help you a lot to find part-time jobs, make new friends and understand the German system better.

Great job opportunities

Regardless of the free tuition fee policy, studying in Germany doesn't come entirely for free – you still need to meet the living costs. Therefore many international students tend to look for a job to support them while studying. It is very easy for EU students to find a job, as there are no limitations whatsoever. Meanwhile students from non-EU countries have to apply for a work permit, and their working hours are limited to 120 full days or 240 half days per year. Earlier it was 90 full days or 180 half days.

Students from countries outside of the EU, EEA or Switzerland are not permitted to work freelance or self-employed. However, this has seldom been an issue since Germany is a very well-developed country where the economy supports thousands of new jobs every day, giving the majority of international students the possibility of finding a decent job.

It's worth mentioning that practice-oriented universities in Germany have agreements with great companies, providing students with internships. These may not always be paid, but could lead to a great future job after obtaining your degree.

A chance to explore all aspects of life in Germany

Student life in Germany thrives on adrenaline and curiosity. German people are friendly but give you privacy; mutual respect and order are part of the daily routine; and cultural diversity is worth exploring in every inch of the country, as it makes you feel part of one entity rather than a total stranger.

Outdoor activities are pretty popular in Germany, including sports, hiking, cycling, skiing and more – so students who consider themselves athletic are going to fit in just fine. As most international students choose to live in metropolises, they'll find lots of activities to fill their spare time; hanging out in bars, clubbing, theater and cinema are all part of student life in Germany. Most of the great German cities are artsy and have a vivid underground music scene, full of hipster fashion, books and ideals which all make for an enlightening and interesting experience.

If you get tired of the frenzy, you'll find that Germans are for the most part more private people, who prefer smaller gatherings behind closed doors, enjoying their food and beverages in a more intimate atmosphere. Once you have a chance to join local friendship groups, you will start learning about "real" life in Germany.

Germans are by all means green. Parks and green spaces are part of every neighborhood and remain the ideal space to calm the mind. Travelling in and out of the country promises surreal landscapes, great architecture and loads of historical data to be revealed.

Another true advantage to life in Germany is the excellent public transport, which is efficient, safe and fast. As an additional perk of studying in Germany, you get a travel card for free by paying enrollment and administrative taxes that are ridiculously low.

Staying in Germany after your studies

Finally, after studying in Germany, you'll have the chance to stay on and seek work after you graduate. The law allows international graduates to stay for an additional 18 months to seek work, and you may even end up staying longer, if that is what you wish. Earlier, it was for 12 Months only.

Some qualities Embossing/Engraving in your Personality

Besides getting quality education you will also intentionally/unintentionally will be embossed with some qualities like- Punctuality, Organization, Planning and Diplomacy in your personality which will not only a foundation in driving your personality and career.

Germany is a well organized and a punctual country. Including buses, trains, programs, people and offices, everything runs on time. But it is still full of life, without losing essentials of life. Under stress also smile prevails. Planning in advance, being punctual, following schedules and appointments strictly help you gaining your goals quickly and easily. Honesty is also a major part of German life. People do apologize, even if they are late by a single minute to attend an appointment. You can learn a lot from Germans and make many friends in the society by gaining these qualities.

So conclusively: People in Germany are friendly, open and very social and they expect the same from you. Proper behavior and feeling as a representative of your country helps to make your stay in Germany a very memorable one.

Better Opportunities wit a good knowledge of german

Your chances of finding a job in Germany are generally much better if you have a good knowledge of German. Exceptions include large, multinational companies and scientific research institutes.

Job Market

There are great chances and excellent Job opportunities after studies as Germany need 6.5 Million Skilled Labor/Professionals till 2025. (Reference: Federal Employment Agency).

Correctly assessing your job prospects

It always takes time and effort to find the right job. But, thanks to the good economic situation in Germany, university graduates looking for work generally have very good prospects. Added to this is the fact that there is a lack of skilled employees in many regions and professions. The fields of mathematics, IT, natural sciences and technology as well as other areas, such as the health sector, are experiencing particular shortages.

Urgently needed - A shortage of STEM graduates

The acronym STEM refers to the fields of knowledge – science, technology, engineering, and mathematics – that are of vital importance in this context. Although the great majority of STEM jobs are to be found in the private sector, the state also provides for employment in this field, by funding a whole range of world-class scientific and technological research institutes such as the Max Planck Society and the Fraunhofer Society.

It is not just the research institutes that are looking for well-qualified, new staff. Industry, too, is finding it increasingly hard to secure graduates with a degree in STEM subjects. In addition to engineers, there is also a substantial demand for scientists, mathematicians, and IT experts. For it is not only German carmakers and engineering companies that are among the very best in the world: some of the global players in the chemical and pharmaceutical industries are likewise from Germany. And the same is true of the German biotech and nanotech sectors. In all of these areas, the demand for first-rate scientists is consistently high.

Similarly, many of the larger companies from throughout the German economy need IT specialists to perform a range of tasks. These include programming advanced machine-control systems, writing company software, ensuring the security of complex systems, and managing the ever larger field of online applications. Mathematicians are also in great demand, particularly in banks and insurance companies.

No matter which area – job prospects for graduates in the STEM subjects are favorable in Germany. Indeed, in recent years, German companies have been unable to recruit anything like the number of scientists, mathematicians, and IT experts needed to fill vacant positions. Compared with typical graduates of other disciplines, STEM graduates are much more likely to be offered a permanent contract when entering the job market and have a significantly higher earnings potential.

Because of the increasing digitization of industry, this is also widely referred to in Germany as "Industrie 4.0". Germany is investing ever more heavily in intelligent technologies and innovative digital applications to stay competitive in an international market. There is a current drive to promote the important issues of intelligent networks and digitisation, for example in the energy sector. This is why IT specialists are particularly sought-after and have good career prospects on the German labor market.

Germany as a country of Immigration

Although it is not a widely appreciated fact, Germany has been one of the most popular immigration destinations in the world for some time now. Some 11 million of the people currently living in Germany were actually born elsewhere. In other words, over one in eight members of the German population is an immigrant. The proportion is even higher among the working population, where one in seven is originally from another country. All in all, one in five people in Germany has a migrant background.

As with other countries, certain areas in Germany tend to attract people with a migrant background. Many of Germany's immigrant population live and work in the cities of Berlin, Hamburg, Munich, Cologne, and Frankfurt. There is also a significant proportion of immigrants in many other cities and towns in western and southern Germany. By contrast, there are still relatively few people with foreign roots living and working in the states that make up the former German Democratic Republic.

The origins of Germany's immigrant population

Europe accounts for the biggest proportion of Germany's immigrant population. More than two thirds of Germany's immigrant population are nationals of another European country, and 36.6 percent are from within the EU. Overall, the major country of origin is Turkey, which accounts for 13 percent of the foreign nationals living in Germany. This is followed by Poland, which accounts for almost 11 percent. Around nine percent of the foreign nationals living in Germany are from Russia. Germany is also home to significant numbers of immigrants from Kazakhstan (7 percent), Romania (4 percent) and Italy (4 percent).

Many families from Italy, Turkey and the other EU member states in southern Europe first came to Germany during the recruitment of guest workers from 1955 to 1973 and have long since become an important part of the German population. Important lessons were learnt at the time about how to meet the challenges posed by immigration.

The group of expatriates – expats in short - has gained increasing importance in the last few years. Such international experts live and work for their companies in Germany for a limited period of time.

The occupations of Germany's immigrant population

German society is increasingly heterogeneous. The foreign nationals who arrived with the first wave of guest workers from Greece, Spain or Turkey had jobs in industry and usually stayed there. Their children, however, already had access to much wider career opportunities. Today, members of Germany's immigrant population occupy a whole variety of positions in German industry, the services sector, and meanwhile also the civil service and the media - ranging from simple clerk to senior executive. People from Germany's immigrant population also tend to be highly entrepreneurial and are often self-employed. Indeed, this is a growing trend.

Today, more than 700,000 people with a migrant background run their own company. In other words, migrants are an important factor in the German economy. And you can be a part of it too – invest and set up your own business in Germany. Germany Trade & Invest (GTAI), the economic development agency of the Federal Republic of Germany, is there to help.

With its current employment prospects, Germany is an attractive destination. Immigration to Germany is currently rising. In future, certain sectors of the labour market will need to intensify their recruitment of skilled workers. Employment opportunities will continue to increase, particularly in the healthcare, engineering, IT, and many other commercial and technical sectors.

Urgently needed: Scientists and IT specialists

Germany has often been called a nation of poets and philosophers. Yet it is also a land of invention and innovation. Many essential products of the modern world are based on German discoveries. This story of technological ingenuity stretches from the automobile and the X-ray machine to headache tablets and rotor blades for wind turbines. Today, the country remains a centre of innovation, with a host of German companies from diverse sectors operating at the very cutting edge of technology.

Part of this is the increasing digitization of industry, which is also widely referred to in Germany as "Industrie 4.0". Germany is investing ever more heavily in intelligent technologies and innovative digital applications to stay competitive in an international market. There is a current drive to promote the important issues of intelligent networks and digitisation, for example in the energy sector. This is why IT specialists are particularly sought-after and have good career prospects on the German labour market.

The acronym STEM refers to the fields of knowledge - science, technology,engineering, and mathematics - that are of vital importance in this context. Although the great majority of STEM jobs are to be found in the private sector, the state also provides for employment in this field, by funding a whole range of world-class scientific and technological research institutes such as the Max Planck Society and the Fraunhofer Society.

A shortage of STEM graduates

It is not just the research institutes that are looking for well-qualified, new staff. Industry, too, is finding it increasingly hard to secure graduates with a degree in STEM subjects. In addition to engineers, there is also a substantial demand for scientists, mathematicians, and IT experts. For it is not only German carmakers and engineering companies that are among the very best in the world: some of the global players in the chemical and pharmaceutical industries are likewise from Germany. And the same is true of the German biotech and nanotech sectors. In all of these areas, the demand for first-rate scientists is consistently high.

Similarly, many of the larger companies from throughout the German economy need IT specialists to perform a range of tasks. These include programming advanced machine-control systems, writing company software, ensuring the security of complex systems, and managing the ever larger field of online applications. Mathematicians are also in great demand, particularly in banks and insurance companies.

Career opportunities

No matter which area – job prospects for graduates in the STEM subjects are favourable in Germany. Indeed, in recent years, German companies have been unable to recruit anything like the number of scientists, mathematicians, and IT experts needed to fill vacant positions. Compared with typical graduates of other disciplines, STEM graduates are much more likely to be offered a permanent contract when entering the job market and have a significantly higher earnings potential. Average starting salaries for STEM graduates are between €35,000 and €40,000 a year.

XIPHIAS Immigration helps you and guide you in every way to fulfill your dreams to settle in Germany. We have all the expertise to prepare your application and advice you before and after you come to Germany on how to accomplish the conditions put forth by the Germany Authorities.

Now is the time to take advantage of booming business sector in Germany. The opportunities are unlimited.

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